Wondering which are the best places to visit in UK?  Together with my fellow travel bloggers, we’re here to recommend various places to visit in UK.

Planning your visit around the four kingdoms of the UK can be so overwhelming.  As you have probably known, the UK is one of the most visited countries in the world due to its royal grandeur and history. 

In addition to that, UK is also known for its beautiful countryside along with the other touristic places in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Oh, plus the famous British food to try around the country.

Best Places to Visit in the UK
Best Places to Visit in the UK

Read along to discover our recommendations. Most of the suggested places in this post are managed by the National Trust and English Heritage. A membership subscription that will let you visit unlimited touristic attractions in the UK managed by these organisations. 

You can sign up here to join the National Trust and/or sign up here to join the English Heritage buy a monthly membership for an individual, joint, family or lifetime membership.

Here are the recommended best places to visit in UK

Worcestershire

Worcester Town

Worcestershire sits right by the heart of England. Known for the great English countryside and Elgar county. Worcester, the centre of the county is also known as the Faithful city due to its loyalty to the crown during the English civil war in 1642-1651.

Great Malvern hills is a fantastic place to visit in the UK if you love outdoors and nature. Located in Worcester is the Firs, the birthplace of the famous English composer Edward Elgar. You can find out more from the National Trust.

Worcestershire is also the home of the famous and loved home sauce, the Worcestershire Sauce. The factory of this amazing sauce is still based in Worcester town where it all began.

A visit to the Worcester Cathedral is also worth it the visit. It is one of the most beautiful cathedrals in the UK.

Birmingham

Birmingham Town Hall

Birmingham is also located at the heart of England and one of the major cities in the country. Unlike London, Birmingham has no grand palaces and castles but has a great industrial history. 

During the Victorian age, Birmingham is known as the home of the Cadbury. Up to this day, the Cadbury factory still stands in Bourneville and it is currently one of the most visited attractions in the city. You can read the other places to visit in Birmingham here.

The Lake District

Recommended by Demi of Around The World With Her

The Lake District

Often overlooked, but unrivaled for its beautiful scenery, The Lake District national park is a must see area of the UK.
 
Recently given UNESCO world heritage status, the park is home to the biggest lake, Windermere, and tallest mountain, Scafell, in England. With plenty of fells to climb, the area is an outdoor enthusiasts dream destination. For those who just wish to experience a quieter and more authentic break in the UK, base yourself in one of the traditional english villages found in the park.
 
There are plenty of things to do in Ambleside, Windermere and Keswick, which are te bigger towns in the area, and all offer great accommodation options for all budgets. Bring your waterproof as it can rain a lot, but there is always a cosy pub to take shelter in and enjoy a roaring fire.

St Michael’s Mount near Marazion in Cornwall

Recommended by Deeptha of The Globe Trotter

St Michaels Mount in Cornwall

St Michael’s Mount is a tidal island in Mount’s Bay, Cornwall. The island has been the home of the St Aubyn family since 1659 and even today the descendants of Colonel St Aubyn live in the castle.
 
The St. Michael’s Mount is now managed by National Trust though and is open to the public during weekdays. It is one of the most recognisable landmarks in Cornwall and even though it is barely a few minutes away from mainland Britain, it feels like a magical, tropical island.
 
Visitors can either reach the island by foot (during low tide) or by ferry (during high tide). Once on the island, a steep cobbled path takes you up to the castle. The medieval castle and the gardens are beautiful and the views from the Mount are simply stunning.
 
With plenty of history and stunning natural scenery, St Michael’s Mount is definitely worth visiting if you are heading to Cornwall.

Brighton, East Sussex

Recommended by Rosalind of Frequent Traveller

Brighton Pier in the UK

One of the best places to visit in the UK would have to be Brighton in East Sussex.

Brighton is an easy train ride from London Victoria Station and London Gatwick Airport, making Brighton the perfect destination for day trips outside of London.

I love Brighton’s history, the narrow alleyways and quaint shops and restaurants of The Lanes, the noise and bright lights of the Brighton Pier amusement park and the exotic grandeur of King George IV’s Brighton Pavilion are filled with the splendour of yesteryear.

My favourite area of Brighton would have to be North Laine. Full of antique and bric-a-brac shops, art galleries, funky fashion boutiques, gastro pubs and restaurants it’s a place you can happily spend hours exploring.

Brighton has something for everyone and that’s why it’s my pick for Best Places to Visit in the UK.

Scottish Borders

Recommended by Heather of Conversant Traveller

Jedburgh Abbey - Scottish Borders

The Scottish Borders are often overlooked by visitors heading straight through on their way up to the Highlands and islands, but we suggest you factor in a few days here on your next trip up north, you won’t be disappointed.

The borderlands are home to a whole lot of history, fascinating legends and miles of beautiful countryside to explore. There are stunning abbey ruins to visit, countless hiking trails and some really good things to eat too, such as afternoon tea with a Scottish twist, and haggis bonbons, so good!

You can visit Abbotsford, the home of novelist and poet Sir Walter Scott, try out a spot of falconry, and sleep in a castle. And because most people are making a bee-line for the lochs and glens, you’ll probably have the borders all to yourself. Which can only be a good thing.

Lincoln

Recommended by Suzy of Our Bucket List Lives

Lincoln city UK

Lincoln is a City in Lincolnshire and it is not only incredibly historic but it is packed full of places to visit.

Down at Brayford Waterfront you will find many modern restaurants, a cinema and boat trips. Cross  the road and you will find many shops with a pedestrianized street. Head up the famous Steep Hill, yes it really is steep, there are theatres, museums and many historic buildings.

Once you have reached the top you will be rewarded with Lincoln Castle, Lincoln Cathedral and a little further on the Museum of Lincolnshire life. This museum is free to visit and is a really lovely museum. 

Manchester 

Recommended by Esra of Arabian Wanderess

Northern Quarter Manchester

Manchester is one of the major cities in the UK and the new home for the BBC. It is only two hours away from London with the fast Virgin train.
 
It might not be the immediate choice when you are planning your trip to the UK, but Manchester can give you a quitter English break with its nice mix of free activities like the Manchester Art Gallery, Imperial War Museum North, John Ryland Library.
 
There is also a quirky side with to the city, which you will find once you head to the Northern Quarter, where you will find all the independent shops, cafes and street art.  

The Shambles,  York

Recommended by Faith of XYUandBEYONd

The Shambles in York UK

I’ve read about The Shambles for years and it has been on my bucket list to visit for a very long time. The photos you see in history documentaries just doesn’t do the place justice.

A shambolic topsy turvy place of sheltered laneways with tilting Tudor buildings on either side the Shambles is  a slice of history from the 15th century. The Shambles got its name from the butchers that used to toss the leftover bits of meat into the streets. Over 900 years old it is mentioned in the Domesday Book and there are as many stories as there are cobbles on the streets.

The Shambles has many a cafe, restaurant and quirky shop which you can ramble through. Being such a small, narrow collection of streets the shops tend to be independent retailers and you won’t find many a name brand store here. The little cafes are tiny and serve a fabulous cup of tea and a scone. There is also a daily market with around 80 stalls selling everything from fresh fruit and veg to knickers.

The Shambles Food Court is a must visit preparing everything from North African food to French Crepes.

Loch Lomond

Recommended by Gemma of A Girl and Her Dog on the Road
Loch Lomond in Scotland
 
At over 24 miles long, Loch Lomond is Britain’s largest inland body of water and the surrounding area, the Trossachs National Park is spectacular.
 
On the western side of the Loch is the beautifully quaint conservation village Luss.  It can get very busy with coach trips so arrive early to avoid the crowds.
 
On the more peaceful eastern side, there is plenty of opportunities to get great views of the Loch.  It is next to Ben Lomond and Conic Hill, both popular mountains to hike. 
 
The loch offers a host of water sporting activities and there are a great set of cycle paths around the area.  
 
For those that like a bit of luxury the famous five star Cameron House Hotel is on the Western banks of the Loch.

Conwy

Recommended by Jess of Unearth the Voyage

Conwy Wales

Off the coast of North Wales lies a sleepy little town called Conwy. Conwy is most famous for its enormous 13th-century castle looming over the small town.

Another majestic sight to see in Conwy is the Conwy Suspension bridge built much later than the castle itself. Although the bridge is newer, it is worth checking out because it was one of the first suspension bridges ever built and it is designed to blend in with the medieval look and feel of the castle.

Besides the castle and suspension bridge, Conwy has a lot to offer in terms of spending a day walking around and exploring a cute little seaside British town. The town is built along the banks of an estuary which is home to fishing boats and picturesque sailboats. Don’t forget to spend some time exploring the other sights Conwy has to offer such as the smallest home in Britain and also the largest beer garden in Wales!

Peak District

Recommended by Jenny of Travelynn Family

The Peak District in the UK
 
Nestled between the big cities of Manchester, Sheffield and Derby, the Peak District encapsulates the true charm of the English countryside with its green rolling hills, dry stone walls, quaint country cottages and old pubs serving real ale in front of a roaring fire.
 
This is the England that I love and the place we call home. Whatever the weather, we love nothing better than a long family walk in the Peaks.
 
Our favourites are the Nine Ladies Circle through Stanton Moor Peak or the walk starting next to The Robin Hood pub in Baslow, with spectacular views from Birchen Edge. Alternatively, hire some bikes and ride the Monsal Trail or Tissington Trail. Reward your physical activity in one of the many cosy local pubs with a pint of Black Sheep and a hearty roast dinner or chip butty. 

Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire – Wales

Recommended by Anna of Would Be Traveller 

Puffin at the Skomer Island in Pembrokeshire Wales

While the UK has some globally famous big cities, it’s also a wonderful place to explore the great outdoors, including my favourite – Skomer Island in Pembrokeshire, Wales.

This tiny island is one of the best places in the UK to see puffins, thanks to it being completely uninhabited by humans and a protected habitat for many of the country’s best loved seabirds. Wildlife enthusiasts can visit for the day thanks to a boat trip from Milford Haven, and it makes a great place to explore, admire the scenery and, of course, spot a puffin or two.

Puffins arrive on the island in early April to nest, and remain there until the end of July, so it’s important to time your visit well! Have a read of my post about how to see the puffins on Skomer Island  for more information on boat times, ticket information and what else to expect from your visit.

Inverness, Scotland

Recommended by Michael of The World Was Here First

Inverness Scotland

The city of Inverness, which is often labelled as the ‘Gateway to the Highlands,’ is undoubtedly one of the best places to visit on a trip to Scotland, both as a destination in its own right and as a base to explore nearby attractions.

Visitors to Inverness can spend a day exploring the city and visiting sites such as the Inverness Castle and the Ness Islands and indulging in the improving culinary scene before embarking on a number of fantastic day trips in the area.

Some of the best places you can visit within a day’s drive of Inverness include Loch Ness and Urquhart Castle, Culloden Battlefield, Cawdor Castle or your choice of the many famous distilleries in the Speyside region.

Isle of Mull, Scotland

Recommended by Kaylie of Happiness Travels Here

tobermory-Isle of Mull Scotland

One of the best places to visit in the United Kingdom is the Isle of Mull. Mull is found just off the coast of Scotland in the Inner Hebrides. Only a short ferry ride from the mainland, Mull has the charm and solitude of the more remote Islands without the crowds of the Isle of Skye.
 
The scenery on Mull is stunning. Can you believe that Scotland has gorgeous white sandy beaches?
 
Lush green farmland and pockets of native forest are home to plants and flowers not found elsewhere in Scotland. There are castles, ruins and shipwrecks to explore and of course whisky to sample at the Tobermory Distillery.
 
Wildlife cruises around the Island are a must do. Otters, dolphins, humpback whales, orca and basking sharks inhabit the surrounding waters.  Rare white-tailed sea eagles are known to nest of the Island and in the summer months, large colonies of nesting Puffins can be visited along the cliff-lined shores.

Great Yarmouth 

Recommended by Mandi of Big Family Little Adventures 

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth is on the East Coast of England, located between the Norfolk Broads and the North Sea. 
 
It is famous for large sandy beaches, and a multitude of attractions along the seafront golden mile, these include The Hippodrome Circus, with its stage dropping away to reveal a water-filled pool, The Pleasure Beach, home to the UK’s only wooden Rollercoaster and Joyland with unusual historic rides.
 
Great Yarmouth has one of the most complete medieval town walls in England, parts of the wall date from 1261, this is complemented by a wide range of historic attraction and museums. These include the Time and Tide Museum, which tells the story of the area and is located in an old herring curing works and The Nelson Museum (Lord Nelson was from Norfolk)
 
Great Yarmouth also has a warm and dry climate, making it a wonderful location for a holiday.

Arundel, West Sussex

Recommended by Nicky of That Anxious Traveller

Arundel Castle

Arundel in West Sussex is probably the best town in England that you’ve never heard of.

For a start, it’s a historic town with an imposing castle dating back to 1068, in which the aristocracy still dwell – but you can go inside! From the spring to the autumn, the castle opens its doors so that the public can have a look around the stately halls, the historic armouries, and most fun of all, poke around the dungeon.

Secondly, the town itself is lovely: small but brimming with character, it caters to your every need for a lovely day out. From antique shops to bookstores, handmade candies to restaurants and breweries, you won’t want for anything.

Thirdly, Arundel was voted the ‘Most Relaxing Town in Europe‘ by the Mindful Getaway Guide, beating spots like Capri, Ibiza, and Baden-Baden. Take a day trip from London, explore Arundel, and relax in the countryside!

Belfast, Northern Ireland

Recommended by Cazzy of Dream Big Travel Far

Belfast City Hall

Belfast is a city bursting with unique history, fantastic sights and of course, it’s the birthplace of Titanic. Northern Ireland’s history is a unique one, and the amazing murals around Belfast highlight the problems that occurred in the city.

Bus tours will take you to important locations, such as the Peace Walls, the Hunger Strike Mural and much more. You’ll learn so much and be fascinated by what went on in Belfast.

Leonardo DiCaprio fans will love the Titanic centre with its iconic history and very own re-creation of that famous staircase. An afternoon tea can be enjoyed on the stairs every Sunday, but book in advance as it’s super popular. Belfast also boasts a thriving food and music scene.

All over the city, every night you’ll find fantastic bands playing live music, including rock bands, tribute acts, and Irish traditional music. Food markets are held weekly and include the award-winning St George’s Market every Friday.

Stratford-upon-Avon

Recommended by Jo of Beyond The Lamp Post

Stratford upon Avon

England is a place that wears its history proudly, and nowhere is that more apparent than in Stratford Upon Avon.

Fans of the Bard will know that the town was his birthplace in April 1564, and the place where he is believed to have been born is now open as a museum where, in the summer months, you can enjoy performances of his work in the gardens.

The town is also known for its beautifully maintained examples of Tudor architecture, which include the cottage that belonged to Shakespeare’s wife, Anne Hathaway (also a museum), and its canals, bridges, churches and peaceful small-town atmosphere. Visit in autumn to see the leaves changing colour, or take a summer boat ride on the Avon.

Enjoy a roast meal while keeping warm by a pub fire in winter, or appreciate fresh beginnings in the spring. Any time’s a good time to see Stratford!

Cardiff, Wales

Recommended by Cath of Passports and Adventures

Millenium centre Cardiff

Cardiff, the Welsh capital, is one of the best places to visit in the UK and is also one of my favourite cities. It is a city that has something for everyone, from the solo traveller to families.

A city centre is a bustling place with shops, cafes, restaurants, museums and Cardiff Castle, a must-visit place. Further outside the city, you will find other places of interest, such as St Fagans, the Welsh National Museum of History. And Cardiff Bay is another area of the city not to be missed.

If nature is your thing there are parks within the city to enjoy as well as walks in Caerphilly Mountain on the edge of the city. You can also enjoy nearby beaches and with an abundance of places to stay to suit every budget, it really is a city that has it all.

Lyme Regis, Dorset

Recommended by Claire of Weekend Candy

Lyme Regis Dorset

Lyme Regis in Dorset is as just as handsome as you imagine it to be. It’s blessed with nearly 95 miles of dramatic Jurassic Coast for visitors to drink up, as well as a flock of seafood restaurants and salt-air pubs that spill right out onto the beach.

Add to that Lyme’s links to Jane Austen (she used to ‘take the sea air’ here 150 years ago) and another literary great, John Fowles, plus its famed Cobb (seen in the French Lieutenant’s Woman), and you have a town that has plenty of pulling power all throughout the year. 

For geologists and palaeontologists, Lyme’s cliffs are awash with fossils – so a fossil hunt is a must whether you visit for a weekend or longer.  

The Cotswold

Recommended by Carolyn of Holidays to Europe

Castle Combe Cotswold

One of my favourite places to visit in the UK is the beautiful region known as the Cotswolds. Covering an area of about 2000 square kilometres, the Cotswolds stretch from Bath to just south of Stratford-upon-Avon. Set amongst rolling green hills and pastures, the Cotswold villages are all chocolate-box pretty but all have their own charm.

Typically they feature honey-coloured buildings with grey slate roofs but many also sport thatched roofs. Chipping Campden, a market town in the north of the Cotswolds, features an elegant curved High Street, lined with independent stores and galleries and an impressive 17th-century market hall.

Other Cotswold towns worth visiting include Bourton-on-the-Water, which is built either side of the River Windrush, Bibury, where a row of former weaver’s cottages, known as Arlington Row, is a photographer’s dream, and Castle Combe, surely one of the prettiest villages in all of England.

Eilean Donan Castle, Scotland

Recommended by Corrine by Reflection En Route

Eilean-Donan-Scotland-Roving-Vails

Eilean Donan castle, located on the island near Loch Douich and Lock Alsh and only a two-hour drive from Inverness, is a must-see when travelling around Scotland.

To access the castle, you must park and walk across a picturesque stone bridge. This 13th-century castle is still owned by the family MacRae, and they gladly open this much-visited site to the public.

You can even stay at a small cottage and wake up to the views of the castle if you like. On-site, you can take a tour, or have a read and a scone in the gift shop and cafe. Don’t miss one of the most iconic castles in Scotland, and make plans to visit Eilean Donan.

Stonehenge, Salisbury 

Recommended by Kirsty of Lost in Landmarks

stonehenge salisbury

Stonehenge is one of the most visited sites in the UK and it’s actually one of my favourites.  Just being able to stand alongside these amazing, colossal stones and marvel at how they were built is a huge privilege. 

You can get your tickets to visit Stonehenge from English Heritage. Alternatively, you can visit this English Heritage site for FREE if you become a member of English Heritage Organisation.

It’s not the only ancient site in the vicinity though and if you like ancient history you’re in for a treat.  There’s the Avebury stone circle which many prefer due to the fact you can touch the stones and also Silbury Hill and West Kennet Long Barrow.  As well as the ancient and historical sites, it’s a great area for walking and exploring the best of the English countryside and some gorgeous little villages too.

Cambridge

Recommended by Charmaine of LuvMiHome

Art Cambridge University and Kings College Chapel

Cambridge is a relatively small English city but one steeped in a huge amount of history; with the Roman and Viking eras seeing Cambridge become a vital centre for trade and more recently for education.

Cambridge is arguably best known for its world-renowned university, which is known to be one of the most prestigious educational establishments in the world. In fact, over 1/5th of the population of Cambridge at any time are estimated to be students. Many students graduate and go on to work at the ‘Silicon Fen’ region, a play on America’s Silicon Valley and an area where a huge amount of technology companies have their UK headquarters.

The impressive historical buildings are a sight to behold, and Cambridge is also surrounded by Fenland and a beautiful river, the Cam, which is a popular area for punting down the river, a British tradition great for a sunny day.

Orkney Island, Scotland

Recommended by Helena of Through the Aussie’s Eyes

Orkney Islands

The Orkney Islands are one of Scotland’s best-kept secrets. If like me, you like to wander through history than these islands are for you. Visit famous Neolithic sites such as the famous Skara Brae, enter the Tomb of the Eagles and see the inside of Maeshowe, a chambered cairn with Viking graffiti that takes over the walls. 

See the modern history of the World Wars by seeing the top of blocker ships, known as the Churchill Barriers, poking out from the waves of Scapa Flow and see the Italian Chapel that was built by prisoners of war. Do yourself a favour and go to this little archipelago that is so rich in history.  

Margate

Recommended by Rose of Where Goes Rose

Margate UK

Gorgeous Margate is a town on the east coast of England which can be reached in just an hour and a half from London. Known for its colourful harbour front, quirky independent shops and sandy beaches, it’s the perfect place for a British day out or weekend trip. If you’re cursed with bad weather, head to the Old Kent Market, a scarlet-coloured building filled with craft stalls, cafes and a public piano to try your hand at playing.

Don’t miss Margate Harbour Arm, a selection of outdoor cafes and bars on a pier that curves out over the ocean.

Dreamland is another reason to visit Margate – a candy-coloured theme park which is total Instagram goals. As well as a giant rainbow slide, you can take a spin on the big wheel where every carriage is a different colour, and candy floss flavours like ‘berry pop’ and ‘vanilla sparkle’ at the numerous food stand. Top up a Dreamland card and pay £2-3.50 per ride. It’s definitely not just for kids!

North Berwick, Scotland

Recommended by Asher of  Asher & Lyric

North Berwick Law

Edinburgh is probably on almost everyone’s UK bucket list but few people know about North Berwick. This quaint little town by the sea is located 25 miles to the east of Edinburgh and makes for a fantastic day trip. If you like light hiking then there is a perfect little (187m high) volcanic hill called North Berwick Law.

From its summit, you’ll witness expansive views of the ocean (and islands) in one direction, while the other direction provides views of nostalgic Scottish farmlands. Another fun thing to do is to tour the Tantallon Castle (a semi-ruined 14th-century fortress) located on the cliffs.

It was once home to the mighty Douglas Clan who occupied it from 1374 to 1651 until it was sieged by British troops. Tours showcase many artefacts that help tell its dramatic stories. Lastly, the town itself has ample trendy boutique stores as well as classic fish’n’chips shops, delicious ice cream parlours and of course, tearooms serving scones, jam, and cream (my favourite).

Edinburgh

Recommended by Gillian of Scotland Bucket List

Calton Hill - Edinburgh

Often described as the Athens of the North, Edinburgh has a rich architectural heritage. There is a striking combination of old and new, from the impressive medieval streets around the Royal Mile to the ultra-modern Scottish Parliament building.

This perfect mix continues throughout the city. Despite having a population of half a million, Holyrood Park offers up a slice of the Highlands, just minutes from the city centre. While Portobello adds a sandy beach, Newhaven provides an ancient harbour and Leith the trendy shore area.

For the art lover, there are galleries galore! From Dean Village, walk down the Water of Leith, and visit the Gallery of Modern Art to see a creation by Tracy Emin. Alternatively, enjoy the talents of Leonardo da Vinci at the Scottish National Gallery.

In the evening why not head to elegant George street to enjoy some of the many busy bars and excellent restaurants.

Edinburgh is a very special city and really needs to be on your Scottish Bucket List!

The Isle of Skye, Scotland

Recommended by Claire of I Live 4 Travel

Isle of Skye Scotland

The Isle of Skye in Scotland is a stunning place to visit. There is so much to see and do. It is famous for its rugged landscape and coastline, stunning beaches as well as beautiful castles that you can visit. It is popular with tourists who come to do one of the many day hikes that there are and you need a minimum of 4 days to really see a lot. It is easier if you have a car but there is also a tourist bus that goes around the island.

The top things to do on Skye are walking The Old man of Storr, hike Quiraing, visit Neist Point lighthouse, visit the Fairy Pools, visit Dunvegan Castle, sunbathe on Coral beach, see Kilt Rock Waterfall.

It’s a beautiful place and one of my favourites in the UK, that everyone should visit.

Lindisfarne, Holy Island

Recommended by Sarah of A Social Nomad

Lindisfarne Castle Holy Island

Located just off the coast of Northumberland, in the North East of England, the island of Lindisfarne is often just referred to as Holy Island. It’s reached by a tidal causeway that allows road access twice a day or a century’s old pilgrim’s path across the dangerous sands and mudflats for the more adventurous.

The island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD and has been an important centre for Christianity for many centuries. Today there is a ruined castle under the auspices of the National Trust, an even more ruined Christian priory managed by English Heritage and a variety of bed and breakfasts and pubs. There are stunning coastal walks and the chance to experience Lindisfarne Mead. This is a spectacular location with centuries of history and a great opportunity to explore the
Northumberland coastline.

Dartmouth

Recommended by Chris of More Life In Your Days

Dartmouth UK

Dartmouth is a stunning harbour town situated at the mouth of the River Dart in Devon. It is one of the most charming towns in the UK and makes a great place for a holiday or day trip.

The town is centred on the bustling river where you can watch the comings and goings of various river craft, and enjoy views over to beautiful Kingswear.  

Visit the Bayard’s Cove Port and Dartmouth Castle for free (unlimited) and other sites when you join the English Heritage.

There are lots to keep you busy in this beautiful historic town. You may like to take a stroll along the riverfront promenade, visit the castle, ride a steam train, wander around the boutique shops and art galleries, or take to the water for a boat trip out to sea or up the river to Totnes.

One of our favourite things to do is to have a go at crabbing from the embankment. You are sure to catch something!

The Giant’s Causeway, Northern Ireland

Recommended by Claire of Tales of a Backpacker

Giants Causeway in Northern Ireland

The Giant’s Causeway is an incredible rock formation on the northern coast of northern Island, made up of around 40,000 interlocking basalt columns.  The columns are the result of volcanic fissure eruptions and the subsequent cooling of the rocks, or, if you believe the legends, the columns were part of a path to Scotland made by the giant Finn McCool! 

Visit the Giant’s Causeway and other sites for free if you become a member of National Trust.

Whatever you believe, the rocks certainly don’t appear to be natural, and the Giant’s Causeway is certainly one of the best places to visit in the UK and the only UNESCO site in Northern Ireland.

You could go to the Giant’s Causeway on a day trip from Belfast, but if you have more time then take a couple of days to explore more of the causeway coastal route, where you will find incredible cliffs, spine-tingling rope bridges and jaw-dropping scenery.  The best time to visit the Giant’s Causeway is at sunset when the tour groups have left, and you have the stones almost to yourself.

Chester

Recommended by Tom of The Travelling Tom

Chester UK

Chester is one of the lesser-known places to visit in the UK, but it’s also one of the best places you can visit. Chester is a Roman City and there are a lot of reminders from this era. The city has the biggest Roman amphitheatre in the UK, while the city centre is enclosed by its famous Roman walls. They are an excellent way to see the city and offer great views of the surrounding area. 
 
Chester is a lively city with lots of pubs and cafes, so you won’t be short on places to eat or drink. If you visit during the summer, you might be lucky enough to check out Chester races. The city is home to the oldest racecourse in the UK, and regularly holds horse races during the summer. It may be a small city, but there is a lot going on in Chester!
 

London

Recommended by Marie of Temples and Treehouses

London UK landscape

London is the UK’s capital and its biggest city. There are so much to do and see here, and so many layers of history, that it’s hard to know where to start. To get your bearings, go for a walk along the South Bank of the Thames, taking in views of some of London’s top attractions, including Big Ben and St. Paul’s Cathedral.

You can also visit Shakespeare’s Globe, reconstructed in Elizabethan style. If you prefer a bird’s eye view, take a ride on the London Eye Ferris wheel, or head to The Shard, a skyscraper near London Bridge that offers breathtaking views of the city. (Tip: instead of paying to go to the top, an alternative is to go for a drink at Aqua Shard on the 31st floor, which still has amazing views, and has a fun glamorous vibe).

Top London attractions you need to visit at least once include the historic Tower of London, Buckingham Palace, museums like the Tate, the National Gallery and the V&A, and Borough Market.

Read more about London:  Best Things to do in London, UK

Oxford

Recommended by Emma of Bubba Blue and Me

Oxford UK

Famed for its Dreaming Spires, Oxford is one of my favourite cities. For young children, there’s the excitement of finding quirky rocks and dinosaur skeletons at the Natural History Museum or enjoying the giant bed and book-based activities at The Story Museum. 

For teens play crazy golf or go to a disco ice skating session.  Teeming with independent shops around the city, and the addition of high street brands and high-end designer stores in the newly built Westgate Centre, there are delights for any shoppers. But the history and architecture of the colleges and university buildings are where Oxford really comes alive. Enjoy walking or bus tours, visit the Ashmolean or Bodleian, see famous film locations and the maze that is Blackwells bookshop. For relaxation and the great outdoors, there’s The Parks, punting on the river and the beautifully calm Botanic Gardens.

We hope that our recommendations will help you to plan your next holiday to the UK whether on a budget, adventure, relaxing or a luxury one! 

Whatever it is, enjoy the United Kingdom!